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What Leaders are Learning

Each week, Leadership Spokane Executive Director Brian Newberry writes about what leaders are learning and how it impacts our daily lives.

Mother’s Day is such an important day because mothers have such a profound impact on each of us. They are the epitome of leadership, defining by how they live countless leadership examples. Truly, mothers demonstrate time management skills daily, help us heal, have empathy, listen and never run out of passion. Mothers lead by example their entire lives.

Leaders never operate in a vacuum. Leaders magnify their impact when they are able to convene others together for a greater good. The dreaded weekly staff meeting is not all bad (most of the time)—it is a means to have a meeting of the minds which ostensibly should benefit the company.

I read an analogy that leaders often have to ride through white water. Leaders do indeed ride through white water but they also smartly aim the kayak to find smooth waters. When faced with choppy waters, leaders try to shape the terrain for the better.

Two weeks ago, our adult leaders celebrated Arts Day and the importance of creativity. It is always a fun-filled day – I always leave more inspired than ever about the importance of creativity within leadership, a focus I have blogged on several times. I was struck by a statement outstanding artist and entrepreneur Luke Baumgarten made discussing whether economic activity follows the arts or whether the arts follow economic revivals.

I personally believe that good behavior is inherent in servant leadership. How can you serve and inspire others if you are leading them stray. That said, the mounting ethical complexities in our society suggest it is an issue to address directly. Arguably, ethical leadership is the foundation of servant leadership.

Business author Ron Carucci in a December 2015 Harvard Business Review article “Great Leaders Know They’re Not Perfect” points out 69% of new business leaders feel unprepared for the jobs they will assume. The challenge of this deficit is that leaders often overcompensate by pretending to be over prepared to their followers, which falls flat if and when they mess up

Last Friday, an epic sporting event occurred which in retrospect reminded me how import it is leaders to always remain classy. The winningest program in America, the women’s University of Connecticut basketball team lost after 111 straight victories. Losing in overtime on a final shot, this unexpected loss became a major sports story over the weekend even as Gonzaga made an incredible run to its first men’s basketball championship. Seeing how the women players handled the loss, many who had ever experienced a loss at Connecticut, was inspiring.

Watching the flurry of March games, I am always inspired to see the winning teams jell because that is the ultimate goal of any leader, to bring a team together to do more than was thought possible. In our American culture, stretching for extremes is always a trend, but the Gonzaga basketball team reminded me that balance can often lead to the best results.

Leadership is not a sign you tattoo on yourself – leadership is a choice and it truly is amazing to see leaders’ different roles to step up in areas they choose to.

How can you effectively lead followers if you don’t connect to them by understanding where they come from? The challenge for leaders is actually developing empathy rather than just pretending.

These three leaders in their own time showed the critical steps to be trailblazers: vision, perseverance and courage. As we honor Women’s History Month, it is important to find similarities between the past great leaders to learn, to emulate and to honor.

This week, however, as winter rolls on with no end in sight, I felt it important to remind leaders how important it is for leaders to inspire no matter how dark the night. Indeed, I myself need a pick me up with all our freezing weather, potholes and other challenges holding us down.

Every February, I use the enormous challenges our Founding Fathers faced to ensure I have the proper view of my own leadership challenges. Simply stated, the enormity of the tasks our original Presidents faced immediately gives me a better perspective on my own personal challenges.

Bottom-line, our teachers in modeling leadership are absolutely contributing to a brave new world. Those teachers who are helping our youngest leaders adapt to our changing society are lifesavers.

Leadership Spokane is committed to the truism that leaders always learn. This week, our 2017 adult leaders met for Education day and focused on the opportunities and challenges in primary, secondary and post-secondary education. I was intending to write on the importance of leadership in primary education but our Education Day was cut short by a large snowstorm. The next day, I had to spend half a morning shoveling snow, a lot of snow...

This week, our 2017 adult leaders hone in on education day and the servant leader characteristic “conceptualize”. It is characteristic I do not give much airtime to it because of its complexity. Larry Spears writing about Robert Greenleaf’s servant leadership terms defines it this way: “Servant-leaders seek to nurture their abilities to "dream great dreams." The ability to look at a problem (or an organization) from a conceptualizing perspective means that one must think beyond day-to-day realities. For many managers this is a characteristic that requires discipline and practice. Servant-leaders are called to seek a delicate balance between conceptual thinking and a day-to-day focused approach.” I often speak about the importance of vision and foresight but arguably conceptualization is the second step in a two-step process of leadership...vision and then making that vison reality.

Leadership Spokane is committed to the truism that leaders always learn. This week we have celebrating our sixth annual Gala. It is a sold out affair hopefully bubbling up to be a party for all. I am so thankful that our previous director, Linda Finney, envisioned this event six years ago, because celebrating leadership is an imperative.

Leadership Spokane is committed to the truism that leaders always learn. This weekend, we had our sixth annual Leadership Lights the Way Gala which celebrates leadership in our region. As we stand back being appreciative of our outstanding alumni and guests for joining the festive celebration, I stand in absolute awe of our nearly 100 volunteers that made it happen.

Four decades later, the life and teachings of Dr. King continue to echo across the fruited plain. Today, more than ever, his calls for unity would likely help heal our political divisions.

Strong leaders are the ones who can harness the power of dreams within the organization.

As we celebrate a new year, it is always important to revisit one of the cardinal characteristics of being an effective leader. Leaders are resolute.

A leader’s sole purpose is to build a team and that team becomes stronger when leaders highlight their follower’s strengths in a manner that followers believe in themselves and the confidence builds for ultimate success.

Author Larry Spears in his Journal of Virtues And Leadership writes: “Another characteristic of servant leaders is reliance on persuasion, rather than on one’s positional authority, in making decisions within an organization. The servant leader seeks to convince others, rather than coerce compliance. This particular element offers one of the clearest distinctions between the traditional authoritarian model and that of servant leadership. The servant leader is effective at building consensus within groups.” Persuasion is not often talked about, but what a powerful tool for a leader’s toolkit when servant leadership is the goal.

This year we are remembering the 75th anniversary of the day America entered World War II, but recent remembrances have rightly focused on honoring the survivors for their sacrifice and resilience.

I am a fan of movies and as the calendar advances, I transition from the Thanksgiving classic "Planes, Trains and Automobiles" with John Candy and Steve Martin to another traditional classic, "A Christmas Carol." The iconic author Charles Dickens published his original "A Christmas Carol" in 1843 and it has remained popular ever since never going out of print. Every time I read the story or watch it play out on stage or in a movie, I am reminded of how powerful the trait generosity is. Indeed, the overall impact of the book created what was deemed the “Carol Philosophy” and had a positive impact on philanthropic giving culture worldwide.

Although not considered a core servant leadership characteristic, philosophically gratefulness should be. Servant leaders give much to their followers but the symbiotic relationship exists with leaders needing much from their followers including their trust. Leaders would do well to give thanks for their follower’s contributions.

A tenant of Leadership Spokane is that leaders are made not born, but predicting the future is much more art than science.

The military, like Leadership Spokane, understands that leaders are made not born and thus spend a significant time emphasizing leadership skills at every turn. These skills translate to civilian society. As we honor our veterans this week, we can take a moment to highlight three core leadership skills, part of their military ethos.

In social situations, it is natural to portray an image we want to display. But at work and other leadership situations, our followers will see our real personas. Being real from the get go is what leaders owe their followers.

I always emphasize to those learning leadership to follow those who came before. Indeed, while technology has changed over the centuries, leadership principles are seemingly timeless. In some ways, leaders have it tougher today because the environment is so dynamic with all the technological advancements giving distraction to followers who have many more inputs to their day than just the leader’s sage advice.

As servant leaders, our focus for our stories should be our followers. Stories can help share the organization’s vision, its past and our follower’s successes.

Our Class of 2017 leaders are determined to build community, to build relationships and to build trust. We can answer the question: “What do we believe in?” We believe in Spokane…that is what binds us.

Leaders too should follow Mother Nature’s lead and change gears over a year. The human experience is not a constant unlike the machines we control. Leaders understanding this truism is fruitful for maintaining good forward progress in their organization.

The value of leadership is well understood and best examined holistically. Presidents, for example, find their mark in history only after time of reflection.

Leadership Spokane is committed to the truism that leaders always learn. This week, our adult class of 2017 shifted into high gear with our welcoming retreat, generously sponsored by our 2016 class.